Pre-Sale Tuneup

Pre-Sale Tuneup

Business owners are often asked, “Do you think you will ever sell your business?” The answers vary from: “Only when I can get my price” to “Never” to a realistic “I don’t really know” with everything else in between. “When will you sell your business?” is often asked, but very seldom answered. Certainly, misfortune can force the decision, but no one can predict this event. Most don’t believe or accept the old expression that advises, “It is always a good idea to sell your horse before it dies.”

There is an also an old adage that says: “You should start planning on exiting your business the day you buy or start one.” You can’t predict misfortune, but you can plan on it. Unfortunately, most sellers wait until they wake up one morning, and just drive around the block several times working up the courage to begin the day working in their business. This is a common sign of “burn-out” and is an-going problem with small business owners. Or, they face family pressure to start “taking it easy,” or to move closer to the grandkids. Now what?

There are really only four ways to leave your business. Obviously, the easiest is to put the key in the door and walk away. It’s also the worst way! The years of hard work building a business has a value. Another way is to transfer ownership to one’s children or child. Assuming one of them is interested and capable, it can mean a successful transfer and a possible income stream. A third way is to sell it to an employee. The employee may know the business, but may lack the interest or skill for ownership or the funds necessary to pay for it. The fourth way, and the one taken by the majority of small business owners, is to sell it and move on. Every business owner wants as much money as possible when selling, so now may be a good time to begin a pre-exit or pre-sale strategy. Here are a few things to consider.

Buyers want cash flow.

Buyers are usually buying a business with a cash flow that will allow them to make a living and pay off the business, assuming it is financed – and most are. Buyers will look at excess compensation to employees and family members. They will also consider such non-cash items as depreciation and amortization. Interest expenses along with owner perks such as auto expense, life insurance, etc., will also be considered. A professional business broker is a good source of advice in these matters.

Appearances do count.

Prior to going to market, make sure the business is “spiffed up”. Do all of the signs light up properly at night? Replace carpet if worn; paint the place and replace that old worn-out piece of equipment that doesn’t work anyway. If something is not included in the sale – like the picture of Grandfather Charlie who founded the business – remove it. An attractive business will sell for much more than a tired and worn-out looking place.

Everything has value.

Such items as customer lists, secret recipes, customized software, good employees and other off-balance sheet items have significant value. They may not be included in a valuation, but when it comes time to sell, they can add real value to a buyer.

Eliminate the Surprises.

No one likes surprises, most of all, prospective buyers. Review every facet of your business and remedy any problems, whether legal, financial, governmental, etc., prior to placing your business up for sale.

Your professional business broker can assist in all facets of preparation. They know what buyers are looking for and they also are familiar with current market conditions.



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